Congress Must Use Its Authority to Prevent War With Iran

Congress Must Use Its Authority to Prevent War With Iran

It has a constitutional responsibility to rein in Trump’s dangerously chaotic approach.


By:  John Nichols

The most jarring real-time assessment of President Trump’s decision to attack—and then to not attack—Iran came from George Conway, the outspoken conservative lawyer who happens to be married to White House apologist in chief Kellyanne Conway.

Recalling the political calculus that asks who Americans would want in the White House in the middle of a dangerous and volatile night, Conway observed early on Friday morning, “So in two hours it’ll be 3 a.m., and an erratic, unstable, incompetent, ignorant, intellectually lazy, narcissistic, and sociopathic man whose judgment no serious, intelligent person trusts remains in charge of deciding whether or not to start a potential war in Western Asia.”

Noting Trump’s claim that he rescinded the attack order after realizing it would cause as many as 150 Iranian casualties, Conway tweeted: “Trump didn’t realize UNTIL TEN MINUTES BEFOREHAND that a planned airstrike would kill over a hundred people and would therefore be grossly disproportionate to the loss of a UAV? To say this is amateur hour would defame amateurs.”

He went on: “Resign. If you didn’t know this until it was almost too late, you’re even more of an idiot than people think you are. Do the country and the world a favor. Go back to real estate, where the worst you can do is kill banks.”